ROCK RADIO TIMELINE 

Dewey Phillips

1948

Phillips' on-air persona was a speed-crazed hillbilly, with a frantic delivery and entertaining sense of humor. He also had a keen ear for music the listening public would enjoy, and he aired both black and white music, which was abundant in post-World War II Memphis, a booming river city which attracted large numbers of rural blacks and whites along with their musical traditions.

Memphis Radio

1948-1952

B.B. King performs and deejays at WDIA. began working as a DJ at radio station WDIA in 1951, and hosted an afternoon R&B show called Hoot and Holler. WDIA, featuring an African-American format, was known as "the mother station of the Negroes" and became an important source of blues and R&B music for a generation, its audience consisting of white as well as black listeners. Thomas used to introduce his shows saying, "I'm young, I'm loose, I'm full of juice, I got the goose so what's the use. We're feeling gay though we ain't got a dollar, Rufus is here, so hoot and holler."

Alan Freed

1951

Freed moved to Cleveland in 1951, still under a non-compete clause with WAKR. However, in April, through the help of William Shipley, RCA's Northern Ohio distributor, he was released from the non-compete clause. He was then hired by WJW radio for a midnight program sponsored by Main Line, the RCA Distributor, and Record Rendezvous. Freed peppered his speech with hipster language, and, with a rhythm and blues record called "Moondog" as his theme song, broadcast R&B hits into the night. He conited the term 'Rock n' Roll'

Fats Domino

1949

His 1949 release "The Fat Man" is widely regarded as the first million-selling rock and roll record. Two of his most famous songs are "Ain't That A Shame" and "Blueberry Hill".

Alan Freed Promotes a Concert

March 21, 1952

Alan Freed held The Moondog Coronation Ball at the Cleveland Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.  

Elvis Hits The Airwaves

July 8, 1954

On July 8, 1954, Elvis is heard on the radio for the first time broadcast by WHBQ AM in Memphis, Tennessee. Deejay Dewey Phillips played "That's All Right" over and over while triying to reach Presley by phone.

Carl Perkins

1954

Add News Story herPerkins successfully auditioned for Sam Phillips at Sun Records in early October 1954. "Movie Magg" and "Turn Around" were released on the Phillips-owned Flip label (151) on March 19, 1955.[27] "Turn Around" became a regional success.[2] With the song getting airplay across the South and Southwest, Perkins was booked to appear along with Elvis Presley at theaters in Marianna and West Memphis, Arkansas. Commenting on the audience reaction to both Presley and himself, Perkins said, "When I'd jump around they'd scream some, but they were gettin' ready for him. It was like TNT, man, it just exploded. All of a sudden the world was wrapped up in rock."[e

Little Richard's Hit Song

1955

"Tutti Frutti" became an instant hit, reaching No. 2 on Billboard magazine's Rhythm and Blues Best-Sellers chart and crossing over to the pop charts in both the United States and overseas in the United Kingdom. It reached No. 21 on the Billboard Top 100 in America and No. 29 on the British singles chart, eventually selling a million copiesAdd News Story here

James Brown

1955

James Brown and The Flames begin composing and performing their own songs during this time including a James Brown composition called "Goin' Back to Rome" and a ballad Brown co-wrote with Johnny Terry titled "Please, Please, Please". Before Christmas 1955, Brantley had the group record a demo of "Please, Please, Please" for a local Macon radio station.[10] "Please, Please, Please" came together in two pieces, first, Etta James stated that during the first time she met with Brown in Macon, Brown "used to carry around an old tattered napkin with him, because Little Richard had written the words, 'please, please, please' on it and James was determined to make a song out of it...".Add News Story here

"Maybellene" Hits Number 1

1956

Chuck Berry rocks the radio all over the country. ....

Transistor Radio Invented

1957

First commercial transistor radio was released in 1954. The mass-market success of the smaller and cheaper Sony TR-63, released in 1957, led to the transistor radio becoming the most popular electronic communication device of the 1960s and 1970s.

"Great Balls of Fire"

1957

1957 hit "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" that shot Lewis to fame worldwide. He followed this with "Great Balls of Fire", "Breathless" and "High School Confidential"Add News Story here

Payola Investigations

1960

The House Commitee....

South of the Border

1963

In 1963,Wolfman Jack took his act to the border when the Inter-American Radio Advertising's Ramon Bosquez hired him and sent him to the studio and transmitter site of XERF-AM at Ciudad Acuña in Mexico, a station across the U.S.-Mexico border from Del Rio, Texas whose high-powered border blaster signal could be picked up across much of the United States

The Beatles Get Airplay on US Arwaves

 “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” Carroll James may have been first to play it on December 17—or he may not have been. It shows up on surveys for WGR and WKBW in Buffalo for the week of December 27, and on WABC for the week of December 31, and it’s reasonable to assume, as was the case with WLS, that the stations played the song for a week or two before it appeared on their surveys.

The Motown Sound

1964

Mary Wells' "My Guy" becomes Motown's first big hit. Morown Records would have hit after hit throughout the 60's with Marvin Gaye,  The Temptations, Four Tops, The Supremes and The Jackson Five to name a few. 

 

 

 

 

The West Coast Sound

1964

The Beach Boys appear on The Ed Sullivan Show in September 196 perfomrning "I Get Around"

The British Invasion

1964

The British Invasion was a cultural phenomenon of the mid-1960s, when rock and pop music acts from the United Kingdom[2] and other aspects of British culture became popular in the United States and significant to the rising "counterculture" on both sides of the Atlantic.[3] Pop and rock groups such as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Kinks,[4] the Dave Clark Five,[5] Herman's Hermits, The Swinging Blue Jeans, the Zombies, and the Animals were at the forefront of the "invasion".

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